Sunday, December 1, 2013

Do Vitamins Bother Your Painful Interstitial Cystitis Bladder?

Vitamins
Do vitamins bother your interstitial cystitis/painful bladder? Are you worried that your limited IC diet doesn't give you the nutrients you need?

Generally adult formula multi-vitamins contain doses of vitamins that even a person without IC doesn't need. That is why your urine turns bright yellow shortly afterward! You are peeing all of the extra vitamins into the toilet! Not only are you wasting the money you spent on the vitamins, that bright yellow urine is irritating your poor fragile bladder lining.

If you still think you need extra vitamins, here are some general guidelines:
  • Try taking children's vitamins once or twice a day since they have lower doses then an adult version. 
  • You can also take individual vitamins in smaller doses. It is mostly vitamin C and vitamin B6 that irritate the bladder, so normal doses of vitamin A, folic acid, B12, biotin, vitamin D, and vitamin E are usually fine. In fact, once I corrected my vitamin D, my bladder seemed to settle down, and there is formative research to support this: http://www.sciencedomain.org/abstract.php?iid=137&id=12&aid=687#.UptZQOKbXOs (click on the pdf link to view the whole article). 
  • Vitamin C in normal doses or from foods is usually fine, in fact, vitamin C is important to keep the immune system, the skin (i.e. the bladder lining), and nervous system healthy. These are all things we need when we have IC. For more information about vitamin C rich foods, check out
    Interstitial Cystitis Diet: No Citrus? No Strawberries? No Problem!
  • Keep in mind that vitamins don't just come from a pill. Often foods like cereal are fortified with vitamins and sometimes up to 100% of the recommended daily intake. Guess what? That amounts to taking a multivitamin. Even eating two or three bowls of cereal at a time has the potential to overload your system with vitamins and can irritate your bladder causing painful symptoms. So, as with all things in nutrition, practice moderation.

Author, Speaker, Patient Advocate

Helping Yourself Is the First Step to Getting Well

For step by step guidance for creating your own personal interstitial cystitis meal plan, see: Confident Choices®: Customizing the Interstitial Cystitis Diet.

For some basic, family-style, IC bladder-friendly recipes, see: Confident Choices®: A Cookbook for Interstitial Cystitis and Overactive Bladder



 **Please SHARE using the links below!**

Sunday, October 27, 2013

Emotional Support Animals for People with Chronic Disease

Emotional Support Animals

Guest Blog by Britani Moonbeam Warner 

Living with chronic pain is no fun. Living with chronic pain and emotional problems is almost maddening. Most people do not understand what people with chronic pain suffer through on a daily basis. In fact, it seems that most people lack compassion for those of us who are in pain every single day unless they are going through something similar. Luckily, there is someone who understands what I am going through, and he has four legs. Neville, my dachshund, is my Emotional Support Animal (ESA). The minute I am in pain or feel as if I am about to panic, Neville is right there by my side. 

I could not make it through the day without Neville. Not only do I have interstitial cystitis, a chronic pain disease affecting the bladder, urinary tract, and pelvic muscles, but I have social anxiety disorders as well. Once, I woke in the wee hours of the morning with intense pelvic pain and burning bladder. I tried everything from high doses of ibuprofen, to taking a really hot shower, to chugging as much water as I could without throwing up, but I found no relief. Deeply frustrated, I sat on the couch and quietly began to cry. My precious companion must have sensed that something was wrong because he came quietly out of the shadows, jumped up on the couch, and forced his way into my lap and laid on my abdomen. I immediately felt calm, and the warmth and pressure of his little body slowly soothed my bladder. After an hour or so I was able to comfortably go back to sleep. If it wasn't for Neville, I could have been up all night in excruciating pain.

 

The Difference Between Emotional Support Animals and Service Animals


Dogs, and other animals too, provide a great deal of love and compassion to those of us that are suffering. Neville has changed my life in his two short years on earth. He has helped heal me in a way no medicine ever could. Unfortunately, because I do not outwardly appear sick, nor am I deaf or blind, I cannot take Neville everywhere I go for comfort, because he is not classified as a Service Animal. 

Emotional Support Animals (ESAs) are only considered  companion animals for qualifying psychological and psychiatric conditions. They are only granted access on airplanes and in housing that normally would not allow pets. As of 2011, the definition of a Service Animal only included dogs that provide services to his or her owner that the owner cannot do for him/herself such as picking things up for a blind person, or sensing that a diabetic needs to check their insulin. The process for training dogs as Service Animals depends on the situation, but you can train them yourself. As long as the dog can pass the Canine Good Citizen test through the American Kennel Club and can perform a special task for you, they can be certified as a Service Animal. The biggest difference, as you might guess by now, is that a Service Animal can go wherever the owner goes.

So, even though Neville helps to keep me from having anxiety attacks in public, and even though he helps to soothe my painful bladder, he is not granted public access by law, because he is "just" an Emotional Support Animal. I only hope that one day the laws will change to allow myself, and other sufferers of chronic pain to have their companions with them at all times, in all places possible. They are Service Dogs, and they deserve recognition for the love and support they provide. 

PS: Neville is going to be trained as a Therapy Dog. Nothing special is required for him, as he already does the job—he makes sick people smile—we just need to work on a little more basic obedience. He is a hound dog after all!


For more information on support animals check out: 

Emotional Support Dogs
What is the difference between a psychiatric service dog and an emotional support animal?


Author, Speaker, Patient Advocate

Helping Yourself Is the First Step to Getting Well

For step by step guidance for creating your own personal interstitial cystitis meal plan, see: Confident Choices®: Customizing the Interstitial Cystitis Diet.

For some basic, family-style, IC bladder-friendly recipes, see: Confident Choices®: A Cookbook for Interstitial Cystitis and Overactive Bladder



 **Please SHARE using the links below!**

Thursday, August 22, 2013

Mast Cells, Interstitial Cystitis, and Is Diet Alone Enough to Treat Bladder Symptoms?

Mast Cells and Interstitial Cystitis
Hi Everyone! I originally wrote this in response to a crazy thread on a popular Interstitial Cystitis Facebook page. The group asked whether people used antihistamines as a part of their treatment, but the discussion turned into a debate about whether it is ok to use medications at all, or if a person can control IC strictly through "natural" means. The fact that people were judging each other's use of medication or not had me wishing there was a "dislike' button to use on Facebook!

Please think about what you post, my friends. These narrow-minded, judgmental views can really hurt patients who are trying desperately to get better. It is never helpful to "shame" another patient into doing something or not doing something, and often confuses an already confused person. 

As a registered dietitian nutritionist who treats interstitial cystitis patients, I know it is a rare patient who can manage their symptoms only with diet. Using the IC Diet to determine personal food triggers is a HUGE help with symptoms, and around 90% of patients feel some relief when they take out the worst offenders. Indeed, we find that other treatments work better when IC patients manage their diet. Think about it! You wouldn't take sandpaper to a scraped knee three times a day, or soak a cut finger in lemon juice three times a day, why would you eat bladder buster foods three times a day when you are trying to heal it?

Now, while I believe the interstitial cystitis diet is an essential part of the treatment plan for IC patients, I never want to discourage patients from combining it with other treatments. As an example, many IC patients have an excess of mast cells in the bladder lining and when those cells are irritated, either by some allergic response or even stress, they release histamine (you may have heard of degranulation) and this can increase IC symptoms. If you doubt that stress can cause this, think about the fact that some people get hives when they are under stress. Yep, same mechanism involved. Hives are degranulating mast cells too.

So, YES, taking an antihistamine can help control this process, and Atarax or Vistaril (Hydroxyzine compounds) or sometimes other antihistamines like diphenhydramine (Benedryl) or certinzine (Zertec) can greatly help IC patients. In addition, they often have the effect of reducing anxiety and helping a person sleep, again, contributing to the well-being of a sleep-deprived anxious bladder patient.

I have taken hydroxyzine for years, and I have had some other nice side effects! First of all, with my IC better controlled, I can eat a  much wider variety of foods than I could without it. That helps me create a healthier body than I could if I had to continue to restrict the types of foods I eat. I also used to have horrible allergies in the fall and the hydroxyzine that I take for my IC is enough to control that. In addition, I am allergic to cats, and I can now live with my two furry babies. So all around, although I understand the motivation of some people wanting to take the "natural" route, the quality of my life is immensely better with the drug than without.

As with anything you read on this blog, I am not dispensing medical advice. I ALWAYS ALWAYS want you to talk to your physician to determine the best treatments for you. Antihistamines, both prescription and over the counter versions, can have serious side effects or interact with other drugs you may be taking. Always err on the side of caution and work with your doctor.

Finally, Here is an article that explains things in a little more depth: Interstitial Cystitis and Mast Cells


Author, Speaker, Patient Advocate

Helping Yourself Is the First Step to Getting Well

For step by step guidance for creating your own personal interstitial cystitis meal plan, see: Confident Choices®: Customizing the Interstitial Cystitis Diet.

For some basic, family-style, IC bladder-friendly recipes, see: Confident Choices®: A Cookbook for Interstitial Cystitis and Overactive Bladder



 **Please SHARE using the links below!**

Thursday, May 30, 2013

It's Summertime! Time to Stock Up on Desert Harvest Personal Gele!

Desert Harvest Gele
A few years ago I started partnering with Pat Criscito, president and CEO of Desert Harvest, to provide samples of their super, duper strength aloe capsules to the interstitial cystitis patients who bought my books. It was (and still is) a great way to get a bit of financial help for my mission of helping IC patients (websites, newsletters, blogs, and printing books costs a lot of money!) while providing the patients with a sample of a product that actually could make a difference in their lives.

Today, I am excited to share that Desert Harvest just sent me sample packages of the Desert Harvest Personal Gele' (which I LOVE LOVE LOVE) to include with the books that I sell! This gele' is great for intimate use as well as skin irritations. I keep a bottle in the refrigerator and use it for sun burns. It is great that I now have it in a form that I can easily send with the books!

Keep in mind, Desert Harvest is currently having their semi-annual sale, so now is the time to stock up on their products. If you call, tell them I sent you.  


Do you use Desert Harvest products? If so, what is your favorite?


Author, Speaker, Patient Advocate

Helping Yourself Is the First Step to Getting Well

For step by step guidance for creating your own personal interstitial cystitis meal plan, see: Confident Choices®: Customizing the Interstitial Cystitis Diet.

For some basic, family-style, IC bladder-friendly recipes, see: Confident Choices®: A Cookbook for Interstitial Cystitis and Overactive Bladder



 **Please SHARE using the links below!**

Thursday, February 28, 2013

Interstitial Cystitis: Staying Active

Hiking with Nordic poles can lessen the impact on your pelvic floor
I know it is tempting, my friends, but don't stop living just because you have a chronic illness like interstitial cystitis. Like altering ingredients in a recipe to meet the needs of your IC diet, if there is an activity you love, find a way to it, and if you can't do what you thought you loved, find an activity you can do.

I loved bike riding...loved the breeze in my hair, the speed....loved that my whole body had to be engaged to make that two-wheeled machine work. Then because if pelvic pain, bike riding started to hurt. I was sad. I tried everything to be able to still ride a bike. It took some mental gymnastics..... but now I walk. I told myself I love to walk. And I found that I actually did love to walk! I love to walk in the parks near us, in the mall, at Disney World, at the beach. I am even planning a walking vacation...(more on that later).

The point is, when you are diagnosed with a chronic illness like interstitial cystitis, you need to give yourself the opportunity to grieve what you have to give up, but don't forget that the last step in the stages of grief is "acceptance." And, acceptance doesn't mean you surrender.. Acceptance is the most active of the stages of grief. Acceptance means that you are becoming engaged again with your "new normal." Acceptance means you are living each day as fully as you can.

Unsure what acceptance looks like? Check out this video: It is so joyful........and keep watching to the end....you will be glad you did...Grandma Dorothy Flies Over the Rainbow.

For more information on the Stages of Grief visit: Interstitial Cystitis: Emotional Challenges of Chronic Illness


Author, Speaker, Patient Advocate

Helping Yourself Is the First Step to Getting Well

For step by step guidance for creating your own personal interstitial cystitis meal plan, see: Confident Choices®: Customizing the Interstitial Cystitis Diet.

For some basic, family-style, IC bladder-friendly recipes, see: Confident Choices®: A Cookbook for Interstitial Cystitis and Overactive Bladder



 **Please SHARE using the links below!**

Wednesday, February 27, 2013

Clearing the Clutter of Bad IC Diet Information by Spreading GOOD IC Diet Information



frustration
Ok, this is me breaking out of my encouraging, positive mode for a second here. I am angry. I am frustrated. I am depressed……I have had enough, and I don’t know what to do. 

I just received an email from an IC patient who had been following a “virgin” diet for the past several months. She had eliminated gluten, dairy, eggs, soy, peanuts, sugar, and corn. She was eating mostly fruits and vegetables, and now she has horrible, horrible bladder pain.  At first, I wanted to SCREAM, “DUH!” But I didn’t….I encouraged her and talked gently...because she was afraid and she thought she was doing the right thing and someone else obviously convinced her to try this…and in the end she DID turn to me and I desperately wanted to help her. 

I get SO frustrated when I hear these stories. I totally believe in patients trusting their intuition and adjusting the IC Diet for their own needs, but where did she get this information? A random internet site? A Facebook or Pinterest group that is promoting unconventional interstitial cystitis diet practices? There is NO reason why this poor woman had to go through this because we have solid research now and excellent patient documentation about the foods that cause flares and those that do not. 

As I write this, I truly want to cry. Her life is precious and sacred and someone is stealing DAYS – WEEKS – MONTHS from her and other patients with their bogus information. 

Trust me, I know why the IC patients do it. I have been there.....experimenting and desperately trying to find out what is wrong with me. Yes, following the IC Diet can be cumbersome, but not as cumbersome as some of the alternate diets I have seen out there. How can we clear the clutter and just get back to basics with the IC Diet?? How many ways can I spread the message? Trust me, I don’t make any money doing this. I don’t work a full time job, I do this. I try to help you. I try to do it in as honest and encouraging way as I possibly can. Yet, when I hear these stories, I sometimes feel like my whole mission is pointless.

But today, I am going to give it another shot. Let me just take a deep breath and try to clarify some things....

First, what is the "IC Diet"? Over the course of several months in 2009, I met with representatives from the Interstitial Cystitis Association and the Interstitial Cystitis Network, and we went through the food list item by item. (See previous blog article: How Did the Standardized IC Diet Come About?) We compared the food to lists from emerging IC diet research and from decades of patient reports. We triple checked it against our personal consultations with painful bladder patients and quadruple checked it against our personal experience as patients ourselves.

Our two primary goals were to provide a liberal list of foods for patients to choose from as well as encourage them to eat. The third outcome was a bonus…the AUA came out the following year with recommendations that included diet modification as one of the first line interventions for newly diagnosed interstitial cystitis patients. What a victory! The doctors were now on our side!

But here’s the thing. The IC Food list isn’t sexy. It isn’t related to any of the fad diets out there. It doesn't involve any green smoothies or purple shakes. But it IS real food that you can eat every day. It is a HEALTHY, NUTRITIOUS diet based not only on science, but on tens of thousands of patients recording their personal findings. Although some IC patients might have additional allergies and foods sensitivities, most can eat the same basic foods. So our message was for people with IC to keep it simple and stay away from all of that other craziness that will just complicate things. Ignore the people who want to take your money. Educate yourself on what we KNOW about the interstitial cystitis diet and what has worked for tens of thousands of other people.

Second, finding good information: The Confident Choices books are not published by a big publishing house, but they provide EXCELLENT information on the interstitial cystitis elimination diet written in a language that most people find easy to understand, helpful, and encouraging. I care deeply about the patients and I hope that shows.

You can pay the same price for whacky interstitial cystitis e-books that tell you a bunch of bogus stuff written by people who don't care at ALL about IC patients.You can even spend your hard earned money on books that are poorly written or are too technical for the average interstitial cystitis patient. The biggest compliment I get on these books is that I gave straightforward and encouraging information. People begged me, “Just tell me what to eat.” So that is what I wrote. It is that simple. Why don’t people see that? The information is out there.

Third, getting additional help: What if you are still confused after reading my books? Or you feel like you really need to talk to someone about the IC Diet who “gets it?” That is normal part of the chronic disease process. It is confusing and crazy and you are exhausted and frustrated. If you want to take it a step further, I can help you streamline the process. 

The prices for these IC Diet consultations are reasonable and about 70% what most dietitians charge. I know insurance doesn’t cover this, so I want to make it affordable for you, the average person. PLUS….Talking one hour with me can save you hundreds of hours of research and thousands of dollars you might waste on other books and products. I can help you minimize your bladder symptoms while you maximize your quality of life. Isn’t that what we all want? 

Finally, spreading the word: Many of you follow me because you have already purchased my books or have had a consultation with me. For that, I thank you. But, now I need a little more help from you. Help me spread QUALITY information about IC Diet on your other Facebook pages. Tell your doctors about the Confident Choices books and my services when you go to your check-ups. Review my books on Amazon. Give people the correct IC Food List link. Tell other patients about my books. Tell them about the IC Diet Facebook page and this blog and my newsletter. Tell them I am here to talk to them when they are the most afraid and in pain. I can help people but they have to know I exist.

The bottom line: Help me combat the bad people who are spreading dangerous information.  I don’t want any more IC patients taken advantage of by those who give them a diet that will steal their life away. If you hear about bad information being spread, speak up or tell me so I can address it.

Now, I need to respond to another email from that patient who wrote to me this morning. Hopefully, I can help her out of this mess.  


Author, Speaker, Patient Advocate

Don't Waste Time: Stick with What We Know Works

For step by step guidance for creating your own personal interstitial cystitis meal plan, see: Confident Choices®: Customizing the Interstitial Cystitis Diet.

For some basic, family-style, IC bladder-friendly recipes, see: Confident Choices®: A Cookbook for Interstitial Cystitis and Overactive Bladder



 **Please SHARE using the links below!**

Thursday, February 21, 2013

Thank You, Dr. Oz, for Interstitial Cystitis Segment!

interstitial cystitis awarenessI was thankful to see that Dr. Oz highlighted interstitial cystitis (IC) on his show that aired February 20, 2013 in a segment titled "Myths and Lies Your Gynecologist Believes." Guest physician Dr. Lauren Streicher discussed a variety of conditions that can often be confusing for patients and physicians alike.    

I have listened to the segment about IC three times now and although brief, Dr. Streicher stated what many of us would have asked her to tell the millions of people in Dr. Oz's national audience: 

Interstitial cystitis is a painful bladder condition that gives people that insistent "gotta go" feeling. It is often confused with urinary tract infections. Most importantly, she repeated that having interstitial cystitis is no way to live, and that it is not a minor problem. She said you must go to a specialist like a uro or uro/gyn or even a pelvic PT who is familiar with IC.  

I have to say, for the few minutes she had to mention it, she did a great job. Although there was not enough time to talk about any treatments, this was still excellent exposure and validity for those IC patients who live with tremendous pain. I actually thought her presentation was confident and compelling. She spent as much, if not more time on interstitial cystitis as she did her other topics of the day.  

For those of you clamoring for more coverage about interstitial cystitis, we have to remember what this segment was about and understand the producers had to stick with that....conditions that are often missed by the gynecologist. Unless someone is doing a documentary on IC, we are not going to ever get a television doctor show to do a full hour on this disease. Remember, they are primarily in the entertainment business. It isn't just because it is a bladder disease; frankly, there are not that many diseases that are entertaining enough to fill an entire hour. We should be thankful that this popular show represented IC in such a compelling way. 

We DO have an opportunity to continue the conversation. Please take a moment to do the following:

1. Thank Dr. Oz, Dr. Streicher, and the producers of the Dr. Oz show on their website where they are showing the video: Myths and Lies Your Gynecologist Believes 


2. Thank Dr. Oz, Dr. Streicher, and the producers (comment and "like") on their Facebook page

3. Share the video segment with your family and friends.



For those of you interested in seeing IC covered in even small ways like this, here is a link to a blog article I wrote about getting IC recognized by the media: Petitioning TV Doctors and Health Experts to Talk About Interstitial Cystitits



Author, Speaker, Patient Advocate

Helping Yourself Is the First Step to Getting Well

For step by step guidance for creating your own personal interstitial cystitis meal plan, see: Confident Choices®: Customizing the Interstitial Cystitis Diet.

For some basic, family-style, IC bladder-friendly recipes, see: Confident Choices®: A Cookbook for Interstitial Cystitis and Overactive Bladder



 **Please SHARE using the links below!**

Monday, February 18, 2013

Interstitial Cystitis Diet Books: Customizing the Intersitital Cystitis Diet


Recently, I had someone ask me what the differences were in my books for interstitial cystitis and some other IC Diet books, so I thought it would be a good thing to post here.

At http://ic-diet.com/, you will see pictures of my three books about the IC Diet. If someone is just starting the elimination diet, Customizing the Interstitial Cystitis Diet, is probably the best place to start. It walks you through the elimination diet step-by-step including some meal plans, the food list, grocery list, some recipes and additional helpful information about other lifestyle changes you can make to reduce your bladder symptoms.

For those of you who don't know, I am a dietitian who also has interstitial cystitis. (I always say you get smart about stuff you never wanted to be smart about!) I was part of the ICA/ICN team that put together the IC Food List that is most commonly used today. In addition, I have worked with IC patients for 15 years now. I do consultations, but found that I was saying the same thing over and over and over to patients....that is why I wrote the book.

So, with Customizing the Interstitial Cystitis Diet, you get two or three hours of my diet and lifestyle expertise for around $30 instead of $90 an hour which is my fee. In fact, it is obvious I am not in this just to make money because I always tell people to buy the book first because most IC patients don't need my one-on-one help after they read the book. For those who decide they do need more guidance, getting the book first always saves time and money because we start out much further down the educational line. 


As for the other two books: A Cookbook for Interstitial Cystitis and Overactive Bladder is just that--a book full of recipes that also has a small amount of educational material. There are many other IC cookbooks out there that are very good too. But that is okay with me; we all like a lot of cookbooks, right? If I had to differentiate, I would say my IC cookbook is more for the brand new patient who is looking for a bladder safe diet with easy to prepare recipes using everyday foods. It truly falls under the category of "just tell me what to eat!" 


Finally, Interstitial Cystitis: A Guide for Nutrition Professionals, was written as a continuing education vehicle for medical professionals who want to learn more about interstitial cystitis so they can help their patients. This book would also be great for an interstitial cystitis patient who want to learn more about the medical research behind the IC diet.


As you probably know, modifying diet helps nearly 90% of IC patients, and having quality tools like these books can make the difference between living in pain and frustration and living a fulfilling life. Following an IC diet may not get rid of all your bladder symptoms, but the vast majority of people with interstitial cystitis experience significant improvement. Keep in mind, diet is something you CAN control. You CAN do it!


Author, Speaker, Patient Advocate

Helping Yourself Is the First Step to Getting Well

For step by step guidance for creating your own personal interstitial cystitis meal plan, see: Confident Choices®: Customizing the Interstitial Cystitis Diet.

For some basic, family-style, IC bladder-friendly recipes, see: Confident Choices®: A Cookbook for Interstitial Cystitis and Overactive Bladder



 **Please SHARE using the links below!**

Friday, January 18, 2013

Interstitial Cystitis and Traveling (Car Trips)

staying comfortable with bladder pain in the car
Many IC patients see my pictures on Facebook and wonder how I can engage in some of the activities I do, in particular, traveling and taking vacations. Certainly, traveling with IC can require some creativity and a healthy dose of problem solving, but it is definitely worth it! 

We only have one life to live and after almost two years doing nothing when I was diagnosed, I made up my mind I was going to live! Some of my first trips were day trips across the state to take my children to camp about four hours from our house. At first I was embarrassed to stop to use the restroom so often during such a short trip, but if I was going to be any sort of mother at all, I knew I needed to develop coping skills. 

Other things that can help you if you need to travel in the car for long distances:
  • Use special pelvic seat cushions that you can buy from the Interstitial Cystitis Network. 
  • Take a bladder analgesic before you leave on your trip.  Medications like phenazopyridine hydrocholoride (brand names AZO Standard, Pyridium, and other over the counter versions sold at your pharmacy) and Uribel (a combination medication) can help make your ride more comfortable. Note: Always consult your physician before you use a medication, and be aware that bladder analgesics can turn your urine (and thus stain your clothing) a bright orange or blue color. You might want to take precautions by wearing a personal liner or pad.
  • Learn to use your GPS or smartphone to find bathrooms along your route. Sometimes just knowing where they are is enough to take the edge off. (There are many, but here are a couple I found for you to try. Please do research before you purchase. Android or iPhone)
  • Take your own food and water with you if you are diet sensitive. Crackers, plain sandwiches, cut carrots and celery, pears, and muffins are easily transported. You can even make your own trail mix with white chocolate chips, bladder safe nuts, mini-pretzels, and IC safe cereals. Alternatives are simple, condiment free hamburgers from fast food restaurants, some chicken nuggets/tenders (know what you can eat safely), pretzels, nuts, salads without dressing (yes you can do it!), and even vanilla milk shakes.
  • Finally, if you are a passenger and not the driver, take a pillow, blanket, some soothing music or meditations, and even ear plugs along to rest and/or even sleep part of the way.
How do you cope having interstitial cystitis and longer car trips? Please share your traveling and/or Smartphone ideas with other patients in the comments below.

For more information on traveling with IC, see:

Confident Choices IC Diet Facebook Page 
Customizing the Interstitial Cystitis Diet: A Confident Choices Book

If you would like to buy the products listed in this blog, please consider using the links. This is a painless way for you to support our work. Thank you.


Author, Speaker, Patient Advocate

Helping Yourself Is the First Step to Getting Well

For step by step guidance for creating your own personal interstitial cystitis meal plan, see: Confident Choices®: Customizing the Interstitial Cystitis Diet.

For some basic, family-style, IC bladder-friendly recipes, see: Confident Choices®: A Cookbook for Interstitial Cystitis and Overactive Bladder



 **Please SHARE using the links below!**